Title

Eagle Rock: Place Memory and Community Cohesion

Authors

Jean S. Won

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1999

Abstract

"Place memory" as studied by sociologists, is a concept in which sites may be used to stimulate social memory. To members of a community, a select number of sites serve as "storage spaces" of experiences of the larger urban area. In the community of Eagle Rock, located six miles northeast of Downtown Los Angeles, the threatening of several significant sites has caused the community to tightly cohere in order to save them. Defying Wirthian urbanism, the strong community cohesion was unusual due to the heterogeneous and disjunctive nature of urban places, as studied by sociologists such as Georg Simmel. Using the case studies of The Eagle Rock and the building located at the intersection of Townsend and Colorado Boulevards, we are able to better understand urban spaces and the effects of power struggles in communities. The dispute between historical preservation and economic development, as well as the future directions of the commercial district of the neighborhood, is analyzed in this study.

Advisor

J. Lin

Department

sociology

Support

Ford-Anderson Fellowship, Camp Foundation

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