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dc.contributorThis study was partially supported by a grant-in-aid from the Japanese Society of Promotion of Science, awarded to SO (KAKENHI 16K07825). This work was presented at the 13th International Conference on Copepoda as a special session in memory of the late Dr. George Benz.
dc.contributor.authorOhtsuka, Susumu
dc.contributor.authorMadinabeitia, Ione
dc.contributor.authorYamashita, Hirofumi
dc.contributor.authorMaran, B. A. Venmathi
dc.contributor.authorSuárez-Morales, Eduardo
dc.contributor.authorHo, Ju-shey
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-03T11:21:41Z
dc.date.available2020-09-03T11:21:41Z
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholar.oxy.edu/handle/20.500.12711/10105
dc.description.abstractIn symbiotic copepods, most naupliar stages are typically planktonic, playing a primary role in dispersal, while the first copepodid usually represents the infective stage. Later copepodid stages, including adults, are associated with host organisms. Many symbiotic copepods have abbreviated life cycles, with a reduced number of naupliar stages and two different feeding habits. These patterns are presumably related to distinct life cycles strategies. Exceptional cases are exemplified by members of the Monstrillidae and Thaumatopsyllidae, both of which are protelean parasites, with infective nauplii and non-feeding planktonic adults. In the Caligidae, the life cycle follows a generalized pattern, but adults of many species like Caligus undulatus seem to exhibit a dual mode of life involving host switching. Adults leaving the first host become temporarily planktonic before attaching to the final host. This dual mode of life is also found in adults of the Ergasilidae. Abbreviation of the planktonic phase is characteristic for some symbiotic taxa, thus suggesting that they have evolved to become highly efficient in locating and infecting new hosts without needing long-distance larval dispersal. The life cycle of copepods associated with zooplankters is also briefly reviewed. Zooplankters are clearly less used as hosts by copepods than benthic invertebrates. It is likely that symbiotic copepods dynamically utilize planktonic phases in their life cycle, thus maintaining the balance between dispersal, host location, reproduction, and predator-avoidance strategies.
dc.subjectCaligidae
dc.subjectcopepod
dc.subjectErgasilidae
dc.subjectlife cycle
dc.subjectplankton
dc.subjectsymbiotic
dc.titlePlanktonic Phases of Symbiotic Copepods: a Review
dc.title.alternativeReview of Planktonic Phases of Symbiotic Copepods
dc.typearticle
dc.abstract.formatonep
dc.source.beginpage104
dc.source.issuescas/vol117/iss2
dc.source.issue2
dc.identifier.legacyhttps://scholar.oxy.edu/scas/vol117/iss2/3
dc.source.reviewer_letterHASH(0x19adea58), HASH(0x12e0d580)
dc.source.endpage119
dc.source.peer_reviewedTRUE
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.source.volume117
dc.source.journaltitleScas: Bulletin of the Southern California Academy of Sciences


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