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dc.contributorWe thank the National Science Foundation (URM-DBI 1041203) Southern California Ecosystem Research Program (SCERP) and the California State University Fullerton Department of Biological Science for funding. We sincerely thank Rick Feeney at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. We thank Misty Paig-Tran, Darryl Smith, Kathryn Dickson, and three anonymous reviewers for their comments on our manuscript. We would also like to thank Homam Jamal, Prarthana Shankar, Cristy Rice, Matt Scanlon, Stacy Schkoda, Velvet Park, Austin Xu, Jordan Abney, Joseph Gamez, Sean Zulueta, Javier Jacob, and Harrison Huang for assistance in the field and laboratory.
dc.contributor.authorBond, Evelyn C.
dc.contributor.authorBarraza, Arthur
dc.contributor.authorForsgren, Kristy L.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-03T11:23:33Z
dc.date.available2020-09-03T11:23:33Z
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholar.oxy.edu/handle/20.500.12711/10322
dc.description.abstractBlack perch (Embiotoca jacksoni) are a common southern California fish that exhibits internal fertilization. During copulation, males transfer a spermatozeugmata to the female via an intromittent organ. Relatively little is known about the reproductive morphology of male black perch and the spermatozeugmata. The objective of our study was to describe the development of spermatocytes and the spermatozeugmata. We also used histology to examine the anal fin and describe the tissues of the intromittent organs. Black perch < 90 mm SL had testes that were composed of spermatocytes at all developmental stages. All stages of spermatocytes in addition to spermatozeugmata were present in males ³ 90 mm SL. On both sides of the anal fin at the anterior end, an intromittent organ was housed in a sheath composed of smooth muscle. Our research note is the first to document the formation of black perch spermatozeugmata within the testis. We also characterized the tissues of the intromittent organs and its muscular sheath which reside on an unmodified anal fin. The copulatory structures of embiotocid species have not been fully investigated, thus our work contributes to understanding the reproductive biology of surfperches.
dc.subjectblack perch
dc.subjectEmbiotocidae
dc.subjecttestis development
dc.subjectintromittent organ
dc.titleReproductive Morphology of Male Black Perch (Embiotoca jacksoni)
dc.title.alternativeMale black perch reproductive morphology
dc.typeresearchnote
dc.abstract.formatonep
dc.source.beginpage219
dc.source.issuescas/vol116/iss3
dc.source.issue3
dc.identifier.legacyhttps://scholar.oxy.edu/scas/vol116/iss3/7
dc.source.reviewer_letterHASH(0xdf56a40), HASH(0xdf57058), HASH(0x2054d400), HASH(0x1d51cc48), HASH(0x1d51cb88), HASH(0xdf56bd8)
dc.source.endpage226
dc.source.peer_reviewedTRUE
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.source.volume116
dc.source.journaltitleScas: Bulletin of the Southern California Academy of Sciences


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