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dc.contributorWe want to express our gratitude to the following people for making this research possible. Thank you to Drs. Mark Steele, Mia Adreani, and Peter Edmunds for their invaluable input, insight, and review of this research. Our upmost gratitude goes to those who helped with the challenging field work schedule including Michael Abernathy, Matt Jelloian, Juan Aguilar and the staff at the USC Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies. Special thanks to Kelcie Chiquillo for field assistance and support. We are also grateful to Drs. Steve Dudgeon (CSUN), Jack Engle (UCSB), Milton Love (UCSB), and Ed Parnell (SIO) for their advice and input to various aspects of this study. This research was supported by funds from the CSUN Nearshore Marine Fish Research Program (NMFRP), CSUN Research and Graduate Studies, Sigma Xi GIAR, and USC Wrigley Summer Fellowships.
dc.contributor.authorHouse, Parker H.
dc.contributor.authorClark, Brian L.F.
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Larry G.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-03T11:29:15Z
dc.date.available2020-09-03T11:29:15Z
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholar.oxy.edu/handle/20.500.12711/10833
dc.description.abstractIt is rare to find evidence of top predators recovering after being negatively affected by overfishing. However, recent findings suggest a nascent return of the critically endangered giant sea bass (Stereolepis gigas) to southern California. To provide the first population assessment of giant sea bass, surveys were conducted during the 2014/2015 summers off Santa Catalina Island, CA. Eight sites were surveyed on both the windward and leeward side of Santa Catalina Island every two weeks from June through August. Of the eight sites, three aggregations were identified at Goat Harbor, The V’s, and Little Harbor, CA. These three aggregation sites, the largest containing 24 individuals, contained a mean stock biomass of 19.6 kg/1000 m<sup>2 </sup>over both summers. Over the course of the both summers the giant sea bass population was primarily made up of 1.2 - 1.3 m TL individuals with several small and newly mature fish observed in aggregations. Comparison to historical data for the island suggests giant sea bass are recovering, but have not reached pre-exploitation levels.
dc.subjectgiant sea bass
dc.subjectStereolepis gigas
dc.subjectfish
dc.subjectecology
dc.subjectbiomass
dc.subjectdensity
dc.subjectabundance
dc.titleThe Return of the King of the Kelp Forest: Distribution, Abundance, and Biomass of Giant Sea Bass (Stereolepis gigas) off Santa Catalina Island, California, 2014-2015.
dc.title.alternativeReturn of Giant Sea Bass to Catalina
dc.typearticle
dc.abstract.formatonep
dc.source.beginpage1
dc.source.issuescas/vol115/iss1
dc.source.issue1
dc.identifier.legacyhttps://scholar.oxy.edu/scas/vol115/iss1/1
dc.source.reviewer_letterHASH(0xca15540)
dc.source.endpage14
dc.source.peer_reviewedTRUE
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.source.volume115
dc.source.journaltitleScas: Bulletin of the Southern California Academy of Sciences


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