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dc.contributorWe thank Brian Colgate and Jeff Cecilia of the Santa Barbara Fish Market, Santa Barbara, CA for bringing this rare specimen to our attention and making it available for study. Thanks also go out to Holly Hawk from California State University Northridge (CSUN) and Gary Burke of the California Gill Netters Association for their collective efforts in obtaining and transporting the head of the specimen. Bart Bagdasaryan helped prepare and photograph the otolith sections. Mark Steele (CSUN) provided the microscope, video camera, and imaging software necessary for the ageing work. Radiocarbon measurements were performed by National Ocean Sciences Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Facility at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Ed DeMartini and two anonymous reviewers provided very insightful comments on the manuscript. Funds for this work were provided by the Nearshore Marine Fish Research Program, Department of Biology, California State University Northridge.
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Larry G.
dc.contributor.authorAndrews, Allen
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-03T11:36:46Z
dc.date.available2020-09-03T11:36:46Z
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholar.oxy.edu/handle/20.500.12711/11347
dc.description.abstractIn January 2010, a massive giant sea bass (500 lbs, 227 kg; near maximum reported size of 557 lbs, 253 kg) was captured off Santa Cruz Island by commercial gill-netters. This specimen presented a unique opportunity to estimate and validate of the potential longevity of the largest nearshore teleost of the northeastern Pacific. A transverse section of the sagittal otolith produced consistent counts of 62 opaque annuli along two different axes of the ventral sulcus region, translating into an estimated birth year of 1948. This age estimate was supported by measurements of radiocarbon (14C) in the other sagittal otolith core (within the first year of growth), relative to ∆14C reference records used for bomb radiocarbon dating. Two otolith core samples produced ∆14C values that were classified as pre-bomb (prior to ~1958-59), indicating a minimum lifespan of 51 years. It is likely that giant sea bass can live more than 60 or 70 years based on growth zone counts, but there is no evidence in the literature or this study to support longevity of 100 years.
dc.subjectPolyprionidae
dc.subjectStereolepis
dc.subjectcarbon-14
dc.subjectotolith
dc.subjectage and growth
dc.subjectlifespan
dc.subjectlongevity
dc.titleBomb Radiocarbon Dating and Estimated Longevity of Giant Sea Bass (<em>Stereolepis gigas</em>)
dc.title.alternativeEstimated longevity of Giant Sea Bass
dc.typearticle
dc.abstract.formatonep
dc.source.issuescas/vol111/iss1
dc.source.issue1
dc.identifier.legacyhttps://scholar.oxy.edu/scas/vol111/iss1/1
dc.source.peer_reviewedTRUE
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.source.journaltitleScas: Bulletin of the Southern California Academy of Sciences


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