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dc.contributor.advisorWright, Dale
dc.contributor.authorCarr, Stacey
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-13T14:58:19Z
dc.date.available2020-08-13T14:58:19Z
dc.date.issued2003-01-01
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholar.oxy.edu/handle/20.500.12711/1300
dc.description.abstractToday?s life with so many hurries and worries could easily throw one deep into bewilderment, boredom, and depression. To find meaningful work, or to live a meaningful life, has become as important as life and death. It is this realization that inspired me come to this research project with the hope of finding some advice on this important social and spiritual issue. I chose impermanence as the theme for my research because of my own interpretation and inspiration of Buddhist thoughts on Meaningful Work. Impermanence is a beautiful thought within the huge treasure of Buddhist teachings. The word leaves an inspiration, an urge to find out the meaning of one?s work, also the meaning of one?s life. Impermanence, interestingly, is also capable of deriving most other essential Buddhist teachings, from which spreads the notion of Meaningful Work. It plays the role of the red cord connecting the series of beads used by Buddhists in each prayer session. This research alerted me to keep my eyes open for exploration for my future work. I become more ready to do so.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Lilly Endowment Project
dc.titleThe Notion of "Impermanence" and the Comprehension of "Meaningful Work" in Buddhism
dc.typearticle
dc.abstract.formathtml
dc.description.departmentreligious_studies
dc.source.issueurc_student
dc.identifier.legacyhttps://scholar.oxy.edu/urc_student/201
dc.source.statuspublished


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