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dc.contributor.authorAgora Project
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-13T14:54:40Z
dc.date.available2020-08-13T14:54:40Z
dc.date.issued2010-10-01 0:00
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholar.oxy.edu/handle/20.500.12711/243
dc.description.abstractWhy do people vary in their beliefs about what is possible, what is plausible, and what is true? Drawing on a decade of research, Psychology Prof. Andrew Shtulman will discuss how two particular patterns of reasoning, modal reasoning and essentialist reasoning, constrain the kinds of claims one is willing to endorse and the kinds of concepts one is able to acquire. His research suggests that differences of belief among highly educated adults can often be traced back to developmental changes in children's early inductive biases.
dc.subjectOccidental College
dc.subjectOxy
dc.subjectAgora
dc.subjectThe Agora Project
dc.subjectAndrew Shtulman
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.titleLast Lecture Series: Psychology Prof. Andrew Shtulman
dc.typespeech
dc.abstract.formathtml
dc.source.issuefall2010agora
dc.identifier.legacyhttps://scholar.oxy.edu/fall2010agora/11
dc.source.statuspublished


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