Show simple item record

dc.contributorWe would like to acknowledge the following entities and individuals for help in gathering data for this project. We thank the California Department of Public Health West Nile Virus Surveillance Program System – especially Leslie Foss, Vicki Kramer, and Kerry Padgett, along with the California Roadkill Observation System (CROS), and David Waetjen (UC Davis) for creating the California Roadkill Observation System. We thank Ruby Alvidrez, Carly Creley, Lauren Zameito, Gina Navia, Chris DeMarco and all of the volunteers who contributed observations. The following wildlife rehabilitation centers provided data used in this study: California Living Museum, California Wildlife Center, Critter Creek Wildlife Station, Gold Country Wildlife Rescue, Lindsey Wildlife Museum, Peninsula Humane Society, SPCA Monterey County, Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue, Squirrelmender Wildlife Rehabilitation, Stanislaus Wildlife Rehabilitation Center, Suisun Wildlife Rescue Center, Sulphur Creek Nature Center, Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center, WildCare, and Wildlife Center Silicon Valley. We also thank the many individuals who utilized iNaturalist, CROS, or other sources to submit observations of the eastern fox squirrel within California.
dc.contributor.authorMuchlinski, Alan E.
dc.contributor.authorGarcia, Rosemary B.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-03T11:17:38Z
dc.date.available2020-09-03T11:17:38Z
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholar.oxy.edu/handle/20.500.12711/9236
dc.description.abstractAbstract - The eastern fox squirrel, Sciurus niger, has been introduced to many areas outside of its native range. Once introduced to a new region the species has generally expanded its geographic range and is considered to be an invasive species, causing both ecological and economic harm. While some information is available on where introductions have occurred, detailed information is not available on the current geographic distribution of the species within California. Since invasive species tend to be under-represented in specimen collections at museums, new methods for obtaining location data were needed. We used a time period of 1995 through 2015 for observations so that location data would be most up-to-date. A majority (51%) of location data used in this study came from wildlife rehabilitation centers, approximately 31% came from citizen-science type sources such as the California Road-Kill Observation System, a previously published journal article, and research-grade submissions to iNaturalist, 10% came from the California Department of Public Health West Nile Virus Surveillance Program, and 8% came from the authors and trained student observers. Maps are presented to show the current geographic distribution of the species indicating a broader range than what was previously known.
dc.subjecteastern fox squirrel
dc.subjectSciurus niger
dc.subjectinvasive species
dc.subjectrange expansion
dc.subjectdistribution
dc.subjectCalifornia
dc.titleDistribution of the Eastern Fox Squirrel (Sciurus niger) within California as of 2015
dc.title.alternativeEastern Fox Squirrel in California - 2015
dc.typearticle
dc.abstract.formatonep
dc.source.beginpage193
dc.source.issuescas/vol116/iss3
dc.source.issue3
dc.identifier.legacyhttps://scholar.oxy.edu/scas/vol116/iss3/4
dc.source.endpage203
dc.source.peer_reviewedTRUE
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.source.volume116
dc.source.journaltitleScas: Bulletin of the Southern California Academy of Sciences


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record