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dc.contributor.authorO'Farrell, Thomas P.
dc.contributor.authorGilbertson, Larry
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-03T11:17:43Z
dc.date.available2020-09-03T11:17:43Z
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholar.oxy.edu/handle/20.500.12711/9272
dc.description.abstractA field study using live-trapping and radio-telemetry was conducted to learn whether desert kit foxes inhabiting the Rand Open Area in eastern Kern County, California, were being adversely affected by human activities such as use of ORV's, as compared with foxes living in the undisturbed Desert Tortoise Research Natural Area. Individuals were more readily trapped in the Rand Area, and fox populations there were more dense, had a higher rate of reproduction, greater survival, and different sources of mortality as compared with the control population in the Tortoise Area. Except for two foxes shot in the Rand Area, there were no negative effects observed in the ORV study site that could be causally linked to human activities.
dc.subjectEcology
dc.subjectDesert Kit Fox
dc.subjectVulpes macrotis arsipus
dc.subjectMojave Desert
dc.subjectSouthern California
dc.titleEcology of the Desert Kit Fox, Vulpes macrotis arsipus, in the Mojave Desert of Southern California
dc.title.alternativeEcology of the Desert Kit Fox
dc.typearticle
dc.abstract.formatonep
dc.source.beginpage1
dc.source.issuescas/vol85/iss1
dc.source.issue1
dc.identifier.legacyhttps://scholar.oxy.edu/scas/vol85/iss1/2
dc.source.endpage15
dc.source.peer_reviewedTRUE
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.source.volume85
dc.source.journaltitleScas: Bulletin of the Southern California Academy of Sciences


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